Below is a list of crop biology documents from Australia, along with a brief description of each document. Click here to view all crop biology documents linked on this website.

When viewing crop biology documents, please refer to the OECD’s Revised Points to Consider on Consensus Documents on the Biology of Cultivated Plants, which provides a structured explanatory checklist to be used by authors of consensus documents.

CropScientific NameDescription
BananaMusa L.This document describes the biology of Musa L. with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated Musa spp., general descriptions of their morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organisms for use in risk assessments of genetically modified (GM) Musa spp. that may be released into the Australian environment.View
BarleyHordeum vulgare L.This document describes the biology of Hordeum vulgare L., with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated H. vulgare, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism in risk assessments of genetically modified H. vulgare that may be released into the Australian environment.View
CanolaBrassica napus L.This document describes the biology of canola (Brassica napus L.) with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated B. napus, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism for use in risk assessments of genetically modified canola that may be released into the Australian environment.View
CarnationDianthus caryophyllus L.This document addresses the biology of Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation), with particular reference to the Australian environment, production and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated carnation, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, physiology, biochemistry, biotic interactions, toxicity, allergenic potential, and weediness. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism for use in risk analysis of genetically modified carnation that may be released into the Australian environment.View
CottonGossypium hirsutum L., Gossypium barbadense L.This document describes the biology of Gossypium hirsutum (upland cotton) and Gossypium barbadense (pima cotton), with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, general descriptions of their morphology, reproductive biology, development, biochemistry, biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism in risk assessments of genetically modified G. hirsutum or G. barbadense that may be released into the Australian environment.View
Lupin (Lupine)Lupinus L.This document describes the biology of Lupinus L., with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated Lupinus species, general descriptions of their morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism for use in risk assessments of genetically modified (GM) Lupinus species that may be released into the Australian environment.View
Maize (Corn)Zea mays L. spp. maysThis document describes the biology of Zea mays L. subspecies (ssp.) mays, with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated Z. mays ssp. mays, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism in risk assessments of genetically modified Z. mays spp. mays that may be released into the Australian environment.View
Papaya (Papaw, Paw paw)Carica papaya L.This document describes the biology of Carica papaya L. with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated C. papaya, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organisms in risk assessments of genetically modified C. papaya that may be released into the Australian environment.View
PineappleAnanas comosus var. comosusThis document describes the biology of Ananas comosus var. comosus (pineapple), with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated A. comosus var. comosus (A. comosus), general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organisms for use in risk assessments of genetically modified (GM) A. comosus that may be released into the Australian environment.View
RiceOryza sativa L.This document addresses the biology and ecology of the species Oryza sativa L. (cultivated rice). Information included relates to the taxonomy, genetics and origins of cultivated rice, general descriptions of its morphology, development, reproductive biology, pests and diseases, toxicity, allergenicity and its general ecology. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related Oryza species.View
Hybrid Tea RoseRosa x hybridaThis document describes the biology of Rosa spp. with emphasis on the Hybrid Tea rose (Rosa x hybrida), and particular reference to the Australian environment, and cultivation for cut-flowers. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated roses, general descriptions of their morphology, reproductive biology, development, biochemistry, biotic and abiotic interactions, toxicity, allergenicity and weediness. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to inform risk assessment of genetically modified Hybrid Tea roses that may be released into the Australian environment.View
Italian Ryegrass, Perennial Ryegrass, Tall FescueLolium multiflorum Lam., Lolium perenne L., Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh This document describes the biology of Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Italian ryegrass), Lolium perenne L. (perennial ryegrass) and Lolium arundinaceum Schreb. (tall fescue)This document describes the biology of Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Italian ryegrass), Lolium perenne L. (perennial ryegrass) and Lolium arundinaceum Schreb. (tall fescue), with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated L. multiflorumL. perenne and L. arundinaceum, general descriptions of their morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interaction. This document also address the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism in risk assessment of genetically modified L. multiflorumL. perenne and L. arundinaceum that may be released into the Australian environment.View
SafflowerCarthamus tinctorius L.This document describes the biology of Carthamus tinctorius L., with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated C. tinctorius, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organisms for use in risk assessments of genetically modified (GM) C. tinctorius that may be released into the Australian environment.View
SugarcaneSaccharum spp.This document addresses the biology of the Saccharum spp. hybrid which is grown as commercial sugarcane, with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of Saccharum spp. hybrid, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology and biochemistry, biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the non-genetically modified (GM) parent organism for use in risk assessments of GM Saccharum spp. that may be released into the Australian environment.View
ToreniaTorenia spp.This document describes the biology of Torenia spp. with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated Torenia spp., general descriptions of their morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism for use in risk assessments of genetically modified (GM) torenia that may be released into the Australian environment.View
Bread WheatTriticum aestivumThis document describes the biology of Triticum aestivum L. em Thell. (bread wheat), with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origins of cultivated T. aestivum, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, development, biochemistry, biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for gene transfer to occur to closely related species. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism in risk assessments of genetically modified T. aestivum that may be released into the Australian environment.View
CloverTrifolium repens L.This document addresses the biology of Trifolium repens L. (referred to as white clover) with particular reference to the Australian environment, cultivation and use. Information included relates to the taxonomy and origin of white clover, general descriptions of its morphology, reproductive biology, biochemistry, and biotic and abiotic interactions. This document also addresses the potential for white clover to transfer genes via pollen and seed movement and for weediness. It should be noted that due to the large number of white clover cultivars as well as the highly heterozygous nature of white clover populations which results in many genotypes, it has been necessary to generalise much of the information provided in this document, and exceptions may be common. The purpose of this document is to provide baseline information about the parent organism for use in risk assessments of genetically modified (GM) Trifolium repens L. that may be released into the Australian environment.View
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